Let’s reinvent the bookshop

Several design teams were asked to reinvent the bookshop:

Their analysis was stark: “Design on its own will not save the bookshop.” But Roberts was undaunted. “If you leave the model as it is and redecorate, nothing’s going to change. The solution needs to be much more fundamental: informed, strategic and daring.” The bookshop, as Gensler saw it, had to anticipate every sort of literary need, from grabbing a paperback or download, to relaxed browsing, personally tailored reading-lists, self-publishing, book clubs, author events and even an enhanced experience of reading a book in the bookish equivalent of a flotation tank.

and

Roberts and Tollit also produce diagrams showing the concept as “a kit of parts” to “plug in and play” according to location and audience. At a railway station, tl;dr might be just a download-and-vending wall. In a hipster neighbourhood such as Hoxton or Williamsburg, it might feel more like a club. “It can grow, shrink and respond to the way people are shopping the store or it could pop up elsewhere.” Putting a tl;dr vending machine at the end of Brighton Pier, for example, where it would sell “Brighton Rock”, and promote the nearest fully equipped store. (emphasis mine)

 

Let’s reinvent the bookshop via Intelligent Life

This is the extraordinary Flint House, winner of the 2015 Riba House of the Year Award and showcased in a series of excellent Grand Designs episodes recently.

The innovation and beauty of the scheme is particularly evident in the detail of the cladding. It consists of a varying use of flint that starts at its base as knapped flint and slowly changes in construction and texture until it becomes chalk walling at the highest point. This gives both a feeling of varying geological strata with the building dissolving as it reaches to the sky.

It’s Nice That:

A residential development in Singapore, collaboratively designed by Rem Koolhaas’ architecture firm OMA and Buro Ole Scheeren has won World Building of the Year 2015 at the World Architecture Festival (WAF). The vertical village otherwise known as the Interlace, defies conventional tower blocks and is made up of a series of interlocking horizontal buildings, ringing in a new approach to living in the tropics.

The new skate city: how skateboarders are joining the urban mainstream

Skateboarders are fighting back. What’s more, many of the general public, charities and councils, along with a few enlightened developers, architects and companies, are starting to agree. One healthy sign of this emerging shift came in 2014, when an immense public campaign saved the historic undercroft skateboarding spot at London’s Southbank Centre from being turned into retail units.

via The Guardian